70 for 70
70 for 70

Dr Stephanie Daley

"I joined the NHS because I wanted to do a job which had meaning."

2017 was a big year for Stephanie and fellow research colleagues who were recognised three times in national awards for their work on the ground-breaking Time for Dementia programme. Time for Dementia is a joint initiative between Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, the University of Surrey, Alzheimer’s Society and Surrey and Borders NHS Foundation Trust. It looks at challenging attitudes to dementia and transforming care for patients by pairing the health professionals of tomorrow with families where a member has been diagnosed with dementia. The students visit the same family several times a year over a two year period, gaining a real understanding of the impact of dementia on individuals, their relatives and friends.

The programme has paired more than 950 students training to be doctors, nurses and paramedics with families where a member has been diagnosed with dementia. Students report the programme gives them increased knowledge, changes their attitudes and develops a deeper empathy towards people with dementia and their carers. Time for Dementia is the first programme of its kind in the world.

Stephanie joined the NHS in 1993. Here’s her story:

Why did you join the NHS?

I joined the NHS because I wanted to do a job which had meaning.

What do you most love about your job?

It is still the fact that it has meaning. In my current role (as a clinical research fellow) it is about being engaged in new developments which have the potential to improve care and quality of life for people with dementia on a larger scale.

I am very proud to be working on the Time for Dementia programme.

Time for Dementia is an innovative education programme for health care professionals in training set up to improve student knowledge, skills and attitudes towards people with dementia and their carers. Students visit a family affected by dementia in pairs over a two-year period, which provides a unique opportunity to see people affect by dementia in their own home, over a period of time. The visits are designed to enable students to see how a diagnosis of dementia can affect people and the challenges and changes that they may face over time. The programme has been embedded as a core component of the curriculum at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School and University of Surrey, and is being rolled out to the Universities of Brighton, Green and Canterbury Christ Church.

If you know somebody living with dementia in Kent, Sussex or Surrey who might be interested in taking part in Time for Dementia, please contact Stephanie on stephanie.daley@sussexpartnershipo.nhs.uk

What do you think makes the NHS so special?

The fact that is free, that is has a history. That care rather than profit is the over-riding aim of what we do.

What do you think the next 70 years hold for the NHS?

Financially challenging - hopefully there will be an honest and realistic debate about future funding - integration with social care, stronger and more vocal user/care involvement - increased technology for self-management but also more emphasis on care and getting the basics right.